Search
Searching Content indexed under Libel & Defamation by Clayton Utz ordered by Published Date Descending.
Links to Result pages
 
1  
 
Title
Country
Organisation
Author
Date
1
Playing by the rules: the law of social media competitions and promotions
Online competitions or promotions could inadvertently expose businesses to financial penalties and reputational damage.
Australia
2 May 2017
2
Damaged reputation, or mere soapboxing? Knocking out defamation claims as an abuse of process
If the true purpose is not vindication of reputation, it may be appropriate to apply to permanently stay the proceeding.
Australia
28 Nov 2016
3
Google's organic search results defamatory - where to now for search engines?
Google became responsible for the defamatory publication once it had notice of the material and failed to do anything.
Australia
26 May 2013
4
Court torpedos pleading injurious falsehood as device to obtain injunction in defamation cases
Pleading injurious falsehood in addition to, or in lieu of, defamation, requires proof of four essential elements.
Australia
16 Feb 2013
5
Defamation defendants don't have to show "pressing need" to establish common law qualified privilege
If the defendant has an interest to protect in making a defamatory statement, it is protected by qualified privilege.
Australia
12 Dec 2012
6
Getting your own back: how far can you go in responding to a public attack?
The common law defence of qualified privilege allows a party to vindicate its conduct or rehabilitate its reputation.
Australia
14 Oct 2012
7
Social networking, social death? Managing your business' and staff's reputation online
Being clear about acceptable social networking behaviour by staff, and being proactive, can minimise the risks.
Australia
26 Dec 2009
8
Clarity For "Deemed" Employers Of Contractors In WA?
Principals and site managers frequently contract out specialist work often under the belief that they are "not responsible" for the contractor's safety.
Australia
11 Sep 2007
9
Sex, Drugs and Breach of Confidence
The British media was in a frenzy earlier this year after a supermodel and a politician each took the Mirror to court alleging that stories written about them constituted a breach of their privacy. The Mirror won one and lost one, but it seems that publishing celebrity gossip will not usually be actionable as a breach of confidence.
Australia
8 Sep 2004
Links to Result pages
 
1