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By Andrew N. Vey
The legal doctrine of frustration of contract is well known to employment lawyers but its application is not all that intuitive to the average employer or employee. In the recent case of Hoekstra v.
By Paul J. Willetts
Social media platforms moderate user-posted content to protect us from offensive, disturbing and sometimes criminal content. This process, however, is not always automatic.
By Andrew N. Vey
We are not long into 2019 and yet one thing already seems clear – the law concerning employment contract termination clauses will continue to be the focus of a great deal of litigation in Ontario.
By Paul J. Willetts
Tagg Industries v. Rieder serves as a useful reminder of the importance of proving (and communicating to employees) a termination for cause, as well as the high threshold that employers must meet in such circumstances.
By Paul J. Willetts
The size of an employee's salary is often seen as an indicator of importance within an organization.
By Paul J. Willetts
On January 2, the Court of Appeal for Ontario released its first decision of 2019: Heller v. Uber Technologies Inc. et al. While the new year is just getting started, this decision is likely to be one
By Andrew N. Vey
When an employee is fired and not given sufficient notice, a common point of dispute becomes how to properly calculate the lost value of non-monetary benefits.
By Andrew N. Vey
In a previous blog entry, we wrote about the laws surrounding secret recordings in the workplace. As we cautioned: "[b]efore creating such recordings, be sure to think carefully about the necessity...
By Paul J. Willetts
Manchester may be best known for its premiership football teams and spawning the likes of Oasis and The Smiths.
By Andrew N. Vey
This week on Twitter, our firm has been examining the minimum wage from a variety of perspectives.
By Paul J. Willetts
The following article highlights some of the changes set out in Bill 47.
By Andrew N. Vey
Determining what conduct amounts to just cause for dismissal is no easy task
By Paul J. Willetts
As we have discussed in previous articles, if you are fired from work and decide to seek severance, you are required to take reasonable steps to find alternate comparable employment.
By Paul J. Willetts
Wrongful dismissal disputes are fairly common. In our experience they often resolve through negotiation and infrequently progress far into the litigation process.
By Paul J. Willetts
According to Restaurants Canada, the Canadian food service industry employs over 1.2 million people.