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Soewito Suhardiman Eddymurthy Kardono
 
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Indonesia
In Indonesia, both a merger and acquisition are statutorily governed acts that require compliance with the Company Law.
Indonesia plans to accelerate and expand economic growth, to become one of the 10 major world economies by 2025.
A central database of mining rights in Indonesia will ensure coordination, verification and synchronization of IUPs.
By Gaylord Watkins, A Supriyani Kardono, Arfidea Saraswati
Indonesia is among the top 10 producers in the world for gold, copper, nickel and tin. Its world-class mines include Grasberg, Batu Hijau and Soroako. Active mining companies include Antam, Freeport, Koba Tin, Newcrest, Newmont and Timah. The country is a key supplier of minerals and metals to Asia’s leading industrialised and industrialising nations.
On February 26, 2006 the President of the Republic of Indonesia issued Presidential Instruction No. 3 of 2006 Regarding Policy Package for Improvement of the Investment Climate (PI 3). The issuance of PI 3 is intended to revive and improve investment in Indonesia so that it will become increasingly clear and transparent to both local and foreign investors; The following two issues are discussed in this article: 'Broadcasting Regulations to be Revised' and 'Infrastructure Procurement&
The Government of Indonesia ("GOI") is continuing its policy of reforming state-owned enterprises (Badan Usaha Milik Negara or "BUMN"). Global competition requires that BUMNs should compete with the private sector. Since the 2003 enactment of Law No. 19 of 2003 Regarding State-owned Enterprises (the "BUMN Law"), many efforts have been made to tighten up the organization of BUMNs, including implementation of good corporate governance and a program to privatize and restructure BUMNs to make them
By Michael Twomey, Fitriana Mahiddin, Gaylord Watkins
Even though the Indonesian government issued a new Oil and Gas Law (Law 22 of 2001) in 2001, and several government regulations to implement Law No. 22, principally, Government Regulation No. 35 of 2004 as amended by Government Regulation No. 34 of 2005 regarding upstream oil and gas business activities (GR 35) and Government Regulation No. 36 of 2004 regarding downstream oil and gas business activities (GR 36), the gas business in Indonesia remains in transition.
By Michael Twomey, Fitriana Mahiddin, Gaylord Watkins
Even though the Indonesian government issued a new Oil and Gas Law (Law 22 of 2001) in 2001, and two government regulations to implement Law No. 22, namely, Government Regulation No. 35 of 2004 regarding upstream oil and gas business activities (GR 35) and Government Regulation No. 36 of 2004 regarding downstream oil and gas business activities (GR 36), the gas business in Indonesia remains in transition.
By Gaylord Watkins, A Supriyani Kardono, Arfidea Saraswati
Indonesia is among the top 10 producers in the world for gold, copper, nickel and tin. Its world-class mines include Grasberg, Batu Hijau and Soroako. Active mining companies include Antam, Freeport, Koba Tin, Newcrest, Newmont and Timah.
By Retty Suhardiman, Darrell Johnson, Mohamad Kadri
In Indonesia, business combinations may take a number of different forms, including mergers, consolidations and acquisitions.
By Ira Eddymurthy, Darrell Johnson
The impact of the regional monetary crisis in 1997–1998 included a high inflation rate, devaluation of the Indonesian rupiah, a fall in foreign investment, capital flight and a high unemployment rate. All this in turn created political as well as economic instability in the country. Three changes in government over the succeeding five years added to such problems.
In general terms, describe the domestic natural gas sector, including the natural gas production (including liquefied natural gas (LNG) production and exportation), storage, pipeline transportation, distribution, commodity sales and trading, and LNG terminalling segments.