ARTICLE
18 January 2023

What Is A Trade Mark?

KL
Keltie LLP

Contributor

Keltie’s team of IP attorneys are highly skilled, hugely experienced and above all, great people to work with. At Keltie we want to understand the essence of your invention, or help get to the core of your brand. We are commercial, driven and fundamentally passionate about what we do.
Trade marks can apply to words, logos, colours, shapes, drawings, even sounds and smells. They are a badge of origin that allows a customer to see a brand or product, recognise it...
UK Intellectual Property
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Trade marks can apply to words, logos, colours, shapes, drawings, even sounds and smells. They are a badge of origin that allows a customer to see a brand or product, recognise it and know how they can repeat that transaction again.

A trade mark is a reference point for individuals over what they are trying to protect - a name, something they wish to sell, the name given to a product or the masthead of a series of products. Some bigger brands have sub-names and sub-brands, allowing them to build up a relevant trade mark portfolio and enjoy more protection.

Trade marks are usually one of the first elements people look to secure when they have created a new product or service. It is often the case that they might create a name, brand and look for their product before looking to secure a trade mark. However, if the trade mark is unavailable, they may have to begin the whole process again to secure a mark which fits with the product.

Unlike patents, you can potentially own a trade mark forever if you continue to pay the renewal fees every ten years.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

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