The Holidays Act has struck again with Waitangi Day falling on a Saturday this year. If the very thought of this has you reaching for the paracetamol, this article will hopefully help alleviate the pain.

While no employee is entitled to the benefit of both days being considered public holidays, the fact that Waitangi Day and Anzac Day are now Mondayised gives rise to a number of different scenarios based on what days an employee would normally work and whether either the actual public holiday or the Monday are worked.

In order to simplify or clarify Mondayisation, we take a close look at Waitangi Day (Saturday 6 February 2016) and set out the number of possible scenarios below:

  1. If you normally work on a Monday, and not the Saturday (the actual public holiday), the Monday will be treated as the public holiday and on the Monday you will either be paid your normal rate of pay if you do not work or receive time and a half and a day in lieu if you do work.
  2. If you normally work on the Saturday and not the Monday, Saturday will be recognised as the public holiday and you will be either paid your normal rate of pay if you do not work or receive time and a half and a day in lieu if you do work the Saturday.
  3. If you work both the Saturday and the Monday and both these days are normal working days for you, you will receive time and a half and a day in lieu for Saturday and you will be paid your normal rate of pay for the Monday.
  4. If neither the Saturday nor the Monday are normal working days for you, if you work the Saturday you will receive your normal rate of pay and if you work the Monday you will receive time and a half, but will not receive a day in lieu.

Whether or not a public holiday is 'otherwise a working day' for a particular employee, is another can of worms, and far from clear cut. However, the good news is that Anzac Day and Waitangi Day will not be Mondayised again until Saturday 25 April 2020 and Saturday 6 February 2021.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.