New Zealand: Kate Wilson ranked as leading expert in field of intellectual property strategy
Last Updated: 20 March 2014

Managing Intellectual Property has named Kate Wilson as an 'expert of experts' within the field of strategy, in their latest edition of the MIP Handbook in New Zealand.

We are delighted to announce Kate's newest accolade.

Now in its 21st edition, the Managing Intellectual Property1 Handbook is a leading source of information for news and analysis of developments within the intellectual property field worldwide.

Research conducted evaluated the responses of Kate's peers alongside Managing Intellectual Property's own findings.

Kate is also recognised as one of the world's top IP2 strategists, having been named on the Intellectual Asset Management (IAM) Strategy 300 list for the third year in a row. She is also listed as a 'leading lawyer' by Asia IP Experts and ranked in the world's most extensive guide to leading patent3 professionals, the IAM Patent 1000.

To find out more information about our strategy services, click here.

Footnotes

1Refers to the ownership of an intangible thing - the innovative idea behind a new technology, product, process, design or plant variety, and other intangibles such as trade secrets, goodwill and reputation, and trade marks. Although intangible, the law recognises intellectual property as a form of property which can be sold, licensed, damaged or trespassed upon. Intellectual property encompasses patents, designs, trade marks and copyright.

2Refers to the ownership of an intangible thing - the innovative idea behind a new technology, product, process, design or plant variety, and other intangibles such as trade secrets, goodwill and reputation, and trade marks. Although intangible, the law recognises intellectual property as a form of property which can be sold, licensed, damaged or trespassed upon. Intellectual property encompasses patents, designs, trade marks and copyright.

3A proprietary right in an invention which provides the owner with an exclusive right for up to 20 years to make, sell, use or import the invention. In exchange for this monopoly the patent is published so that others can see how the invention works and build on that knowledge. The patented invention may also be used by the public once the patent lapses.

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