New Zealand: Innovate to Succeed Workshops September 2013 - register now
Last Updated: 30 July 2013

Join us on an innovation and commercialisation journey to help you create a culture of innovation in your business.

If growing your business is a challenge then taking time out to develop new thinking is essential to stay ahead of your game. Join us on an innovation and commercialisation1 journey to learn how to create a culture of innovation in your business, from developing targeted new products and services to successfully launching your innovation to market.

Co-presented by Kate Wilson, Partner and IP2 Strategist at James & Wells Intellectual Property3 and Louise Webster, Director, Ideas Accelerator.

Register now for a half day interactive workshop in a location near you (Dunedin, Christchurch, Auckland and Hamilton). Click here for the workshop outline, dates and to register online.

Please scroll down the Event page to view this particular seminar series.

Footnotes

1Refers to the process of introducing a new product or service to the marketplace (whether in New Zealand or overseas). For the purposes of a patent application commercial working can include taking orders for a product or service (even if in confidence). It is important to understand that commercial working of an invention before a patent application is filed may invalidate that patent application (see validity below).

2Refers to the ownership of an intangible thing - the innovative idea behind a new technology, product, process, design or plant variety, and other intangibles such as trade secrets, goodwill and reputation, and trade marks. Although intangible, the law recognises intellectual property as a form of property which can be sold, licensed, damaged or trespassed upon. Intellectual property encompasses patents, designs, trade marks and copyright.

3Refers to the ownership of an intangible thing - the innovative idea behind a new technology, product, process, design or plant variety, and other intangibles such as trade secrets, goodwill and reputation, and trade marks. Although intangible, the law recognises intellectual property as a form of property which can be sold, licensed, damaged or trespassed upon. Intellectual property encompasses patents, designs, trade marks and copyright.

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