New Zealand: James & Wells mentors Unlimited Investment Challenge finalists to help them succeed
Last Updated: 5 February 2013

As founding sponsor and business mentor James & Wells has provided finalists with expert IP advice and support

James & Wells Intellectual Property1 provided expert IP2 advice to the finalists of the 2012 Unlimited Investment Challenge to help New Zealand businesses get investment ready to grow in international export markets.

The Unlimited Investment Challenge, now in its sixth year, helps New Zealand businesses get investment ready and targets trading businesses seeking expansion and growth finance.

As founding sponsor and business mentor, James & Wells provided support to finalists offering expert intellectual property advice.

Senior Associate Gus Hazel provided participants and finalists with valuable IP business mentoring services including facilitation of an IP strategy workshop; Creating value from your intellectual property.

"IP is a core part of any business looking to export to international markets," says Hazel. "It's important to incorporate IP into your business strategy from the start and gain an understanding of trademarks and patents and the costs involved. Exporters should be proactive and have clear strategies to protect their IP and avoid infringing that of others."

Participants of the five-month programme had the opportunity to research, analyse and structure their business models and rehearse their investment pitches before making real pitches to real investors with real money.

This year's Unlimited Investment Challenge finalists:

  • Bruce Aylward, Psoda Limited
  • Leigh Burney, popdoc Ltd
  • Brett Hawthorne, Taska
  • Ollie Langridge & Paula Nightingale, Company X
  • Graham Nel, Disaster Prepare Ltd
  • Louise Donnelly – Davey, Scratch
  • Ben Bodley – Teknique Limited
  • Pravin D' Lima, Everfresh Partners Limited

James & Wells congratulates this years finalists and wishes them a successful year ahead.

Footnotes

1Refers to the ownership of an intangible thing - the innovative idea behind a new technology, product, process, design or plant variety, and other intangibles such as trade secrets, goodwill and reputation, and trade marks. Although intangible, the law recognises intellectual property as a form of property which can be sold, licensed, damaged or trespassed upon. Intellectual property encompasses patents, designs, trade marks and copyright.

2Refers to the ownership of an intangible thing - the innovative idea behind a new technology, product, process, design or plant variety, and other intangibles such as trade secrets, goodwill and reputation, and trade marks. Although intangible, the law recognises intellectual property as a form of property which can be sold, licensed, damaged or trespassed upon. Intellectual property encompasses patents, designs, trade marks and copyright.

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