New Zealand: James & Wells partners named in world intellectual property elite
Last Updated: 5 July 2012

Our firm is driven to ensure our clients receive world class IP advice.

A supreme ability to help New Zealand companies protect their intellectual property1 has earned James & Wells partners Ian Finch, Kate Wilson and Simon Rowell coveted places among the world's elite IP2 experts.

Kate Wilson and Simon Rowell are the only New Zealand-based experts in IAM Strategy 300: the World's Leading IP Strategists, recently announced by influential magazine Intellectual Asset Management.

Ian Finch and Simon Rowell were named in the inaugural sister publication3 IAM Patent 1000: The World's Patent Practitioners

The compilers of the two IAM publications spent months investigating the credentials of strategists and patent4 practitioners in dozens of countries, including speaking to their clients.

Ian Finch, James & Wells Intellectual Property's Hamilton-based Managing Partner, is president of the NZ Institute of Patent Attorneys, editor of James & Wells Intellectual Property Law in New Zealand, published5 by Thompson Reuters, and has acted as counsel in many of New Zealand's leading intellectual property decisions.

Kate Wilson, based in the firm's Hamilton office, is the go-to expert for New Zealand companies such as Gallagher Group and Bomac Laboratories (before it was acquired by Bayer), helping them to gain a competitive edge.

Auckland-based Simon Rowell specialises in helping Kiwi companies such as Cookie Time and Rockit, commercialise their innovations using a suite of clever IP strategies.

Kate Wilson, who last year became the first New Zealander to be named in the world elite, says making the list is an important accolade, particularly as James & Wells Intellectual Property's clients had obviously been able to convey the positive results which had come from employing their IP strategist.

"James & Wells' reputation is growing in overseas markets thanks to the work we do for some of our smartest and best Kiwi companies globally, and I am proud to be recognised in the most respected reference for companies seeking comprehensive IP strategies," she says.

Kate Wilson has been on a crusade to convince New Zealand businesses to think much more strategically about protecting their IP and linking this to their business goals.

Ian Finch says: "James & Wells is driven to ensure our clients receive world-class IP advice. Our three-peat as IP Law Firm of the Year, and accolades such as these from IAM show we are delivering on our goal to help clients protect their most valuable asset."

Simon Rowell, who made the IAM Strategy 300 for the first time, says coming up with innovative ideas has long been a strength in New Zealand, but a clever commercialisation6 strategy underpinned by a strong IP position is the secret to successfully getting the idea to market.

"It is important for all New Zealand companies to work with an IP strategist who understands their business inside out. With the right advice, they can use their major assets to compete, leverage deals, generate multiple revenue streams and build sustainable businesses."

Footnotes

1Refers to the ownership of an intangible thing - the innovative idea behind a new technology, product, process, design or plant variety, and other intangibles such as trade secrets, goodwill and reputation, and trade marks. Although intangible, the law recognises intellectual property as a form of property which can be sold, licensed, damaged or trespassed upon. Intellectual property encompasses patents, designs, trade marks and copyright.
2Refers to the ownership of an intangible thing - the innovative idea behind a new technology, product, process, design or plant variety, and other intangibles such as trade secrets, goodwill and reputation, and trade marks. Although intangible, the law recognises intellectual property as a form of property which can be sold, licensed, damaged or trespassed upon. Intellectual property encompasses patents, designs, trade marks and copyright.
3At some point a patent application is published, meaning its contents are available for anyone to read. In New Zealand publication occurs when a patent application is accepted. However, in most countries publication occurs 18 months after the application is filed.
4A proprietary right in an invention which provides the owner with an exclusive right for up to 20 years to make, sell, use or import the invention. In exchange for this monopoly the patent is published so that others can see how the invention works and build on that knowledge. The patented invention may also be used by the public once the patent lapses.
5At some point a patent application is published, meaning its contents are available for anyone to read. In New Zealand publication occurs when a patent application is accepted. However, in most countries publication occurs 18 months after the application is filed.
6Refers to the process of introducing a new product or service to the marketplace (whether in New Zealand or overseas). For the purposes of a patent application commercial working can include taking orders for a product or service (even if in confidence). It is important to understand that commercial working of an invention before a patent application is filed may invalidate that patent application (see validity below).

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