Comparative Guides
Welcome to Mondaq Comparative Guides - your comparative global Q&A guide.
Our Comparative Guides provide an overview of some of the key points of law and practice and allow you to compare regulatory environments and laws across multiple jurisdictions.
Start by selecting your Topic of interest below. Then choose your Regions and finally refine the exact Subjects you are seeking clarity on to view detailed analysis provided by our carefully selected internationally recognised experts.
Results: 4 Answers
Labour and Employment
2.
Employment rights and representations
2.1
What, if any, are the rights to parental leave, at either a national or local level?
 
Thailand
Female employees have a statutory right to take maternity leave of up to 98 days (inclusive of all holidays in between) per pregnancy.

For more information about this answer please contact: Wayu Suthisarnsuntorn from Pisut & Partners
2.2
How long does it last and what benefits are given during this time?
 
Thailand
Up to 98 days (inclusive of all holidays in between) per pregnancy. However, employees who take maternity leave will be paid only 45 days’ wages during such leave. In practice, therefore, lower-income employees usually take only 45 days of maternity leave.

For more information about this answer please contact: Wayu Suthisarnsuntorn from Pisut & Partners
2.3
Are trade unions recognised and what rights do they have?
 
Thailand
Yes, trade unions are legally recognised and protected under Thai law. They have collective bargaining rights and can arrange strikes in some cases. Apart from trade unions, other types of employee-oriented organisations are also recognised under Thai labour laws, such as employee committees, welfare committees and labour federations, each of which has its own rights, duties and protection under the law.

For more information about this answer please contact: Wayu Suthisarnsuntorn from Pisut & Partners
2.4
How are data protection rules applied in the workforce and how does this affect employees’ privacy rights?
 
Thailand
In early 2019 Thailand enacted a universal data privacy law which generally applies to everyone in Thailand, including employees. When this new law becomes fully effective in mid-2020, employers will be required to seek the express and informed consent of each employee in connection with the collection, use and/or dissemination of his or her personal data. Also, employers are highly discouraged from collecting sensitive information – such as information relating to religion, race, political views, criminal records or health records – from their employees.

For more information about this answer please contact: Wayu Suthisarnsuntorn from Pisut & Partners
2.5
Are contingent worker arrangements specifically regulated?
 
Thailand
No, contingent workers (eg, independent contractors, consultants) are not specifically regulated in Thailand. The relationships between them and their employers are governed by the law of contracts under the Civil and Commercial Code.

For more information about this answer please contact: Wayu Suthisarnsuntorn from Pisut & Partners