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Results: 4 Answers
Enforcement of Foreign Judgments
7.
Enforcing the foreign judgment
7.1
Once a declaration of enforceability has been granted, how can the foreign judgment be enforced?
 
Greece
Once a declaration of enforceability has been granted, the judgment (accompanied by any necessary supporting documents) shall be served by the creditor on the defendant through a local court bailiff (ie, the enforcement authority in Greece) to initiate enforcement proceedings pursuant to the provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure on the enforcement of domestic judgments. In general, the creditor can proceed with all enforcement actions according to the domestic legislation – that is, the attachment of any movable or immovable property in the possession of the debtor or in the possession of third parties which are debtors of the debtor, the liquidation of such assets through public auction and receipt of the proceeds, subject to any rights or claims of other creditors with priority over distribution (eg, secured claims).

For more information about this answer please contact: Tasos Kollas from KLC Law
7.2
Can the foreign judgment be enforced against third parties?
 
Greece
In general, a foreign judgment is enforceable only against the parties to which it is addressed. The parties against which a foreign judgment can be enforced are determined, in principle, by the foreign enforceable judgment. An extension of the so-called ‘subjective limits’ of res judicata, which is possible under Greek law based on the provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure, may apply; however, the law of the state of origin and the lex causae will be taken into account.

For more information about this answer please contact: Tasos Kollas from KLC Law