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Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution (CEDR)
 
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Tel: +44 020 7536 6000
Fax: +44 020 7536 6001
International Dispute Resolution Centre,
70 Fleet Street,
London
EC4Y 1EU
UK
By Graham Massie
There are many laudable aspects to the new Code - it takes us back to working with principled guidelines rather than rigid process rules; and it encourages, through the use of mediation, the restoration of common sense in trying to find a resolution to workplace grievances.
By Andy Grossman
Construction disputes are complex and often a dispute related to a small part of the works can lead to serious and far-reaching consequences unless a solution can be found quickly.
By James South
The UK mediation market has developed organically, both in a self-regulatory sense and in the development of training programmes and growth of the market in general
By Tony Allen
On 6 April 2009, the old Practice Direction to the Protocol was replaced by the new Pre-action Conduct Practice Direction (the PCPD).
By Graham Massie
It’s always bothered me in mediations when – in what I suspect is largely an attempt to bolster their own confidence – someone claims they’ve got a “75% chance of winning at trial”.
By Isabel Phillips
How to persuade clients to negotiate (and that they might enjoy it!)
By Ranse Howell, Graham Massie
With the holidays behind us, and economic troubles looming, employee morale is running low and managers are having to deal with a vast array of HR issues many of which surface in the form of conflict in the workplace.
By Tony Allen
Having mediated personal injury and clinical negligence disputes for the past 13 years, it is pleasing to see that there are now signs of modest satisfaction that mediation really has begun to be understood and used, particularly after its frustratingly slow development during the early part of that period.
Disagreements that disrupt the flow of work are, of course, inevitable - and costly. The time spent managing the conflict adds up, and distracted employees inevitably produce work of comparatively lower quality.