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Integritas Workplace Law Corporation
 
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185-9040 Blundell Road,
Suite #155
Richmond
BC V6Y 1K3
Canada
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
The Complainant was a Muslim of Iranian descent.
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
A very recent decision from the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of British Columbia (OIPC), 2017 BCIPC 58, is a reminder to employers about employee privacy...
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
Many organizations conduct formal performance reviews, typically once a year. While such reviews can be an invaluable tool for evaluating employees, if done poorly, without preparation...
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
Most companies wish to include restrictive covenants in their employment and contractor agreements.
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
Employers have many obligations under the British Columbia Workers Compensation Act (the "Act") and the related WorkSafeBC Occupational Health and Safety Regulation (the "Regulation").
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
McNish v. Electronics Boutique Canada and others, 2017 BCHRT 32 ("McNish") a decision earlier this year by the BC Human Rights Tribunal on an application to dismiss, illustrates an employer's duty to inquire...
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
A workplace investigation that is not done properly can result in significant legal liability for an employer and sometimes, even the investigator.
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
In its recently released decision of Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal Corp, 2017 SCC 30, the Supreme Court of Canada held that an employer had cause to dismiss Ian Stewart, a mine worker...
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
It is not uncommon for employment agreements to include a probationary clause. The rationale behind a probationary period is to enable the parties to determine whether a continued employment relationship is viable.
By Heather Hettiarachchi, LL.B M.Sc
In Buchanan v Introjunction Ltd., 2017 BCSC 1002, the BC Supreme court made it clear that, in the absence of an express contractual provision to the contrary, an employer can be liable for damages...